Service Pro Truck Lines Shares the Stats!

Service Pro Truck Lines Shares the Stats!

Service Pro Truck Lines has been in the expedited shipping business for quite some time. We’ve seen a “few” changes over the years, from cb’s to cell phones, from log books to e-logs and plenty of other changes in between! Today – we thought it might be a real trip down “memory lane” to look at how much “life in the lanes” has changed.

Then:

  • CB Radio – Does anyone actually remember what “CB” stands for? It’s Citizens Band and these radios used to be the gold standard for truckers to stay in contact with one another, radio for help when needed and keep an eye on and report to other drivers on traffic conditions in the area. With a range of about 15 miles or so, a CB is often what kept a driver company while they travelled down the road.

Now:

  • You might think the CB is dead but some drivers, particularly veterans of the open road, still use a CB radio regularly. These days however, it’s also true that just about everyone has a cell phone and/or tablet device. Many “Truck Apps” abound and smartphones now allow drivers to stay in touch easily with both their dispatch and with family and friends.

Then:

  • Log Books – According to the Ministry of Transportation in Ontario (we’re pretty sure you don’t want to read about all of the various provinces so we just used this one as an example!) here is what a typical log book would contain “back in the day”:

Daily log requirement

A daily log may be handwritten, computer generated or made by means of a recording device. The daily log must contain the following information:

  • Driver’s name
  • Date
  • Name of the driver’s co-drivers, if any
  • Start time of the day being recorded, if the day does not start at midnight
  • Cycle that the driver is following
  • Odometer reading, at the start of the day
  • Number plate of each commercial motor vehicle to be driven and each trailer
  • Name of the operator
  • Address of the driver’s home terminal and of the principal place of business of the operator
  • Graph grid as illustrated in Form 1 of the regulation (not required for Recording Device)
  • Start and end times for each duty status during the day
  • Location where the driver’s duty status changes
  • Total time spent in each duty status during the day
  • Odometer reading at the end of the day
  • Total distance driven by the driver
  • Driver’s signature (1)

Now:

  • E-Logs – An e-log serves the same purpose as the old-fashioned log books but takes manual labour out of the equation. An e-log is an ELD (Electronic Logging Device) that connects directly to a truck engine’s control module (ECM). It automatically records driver compliance with hours of service and tracks vehicle data like date, time, location information and miles driven. In the US, the use of e-logs is already mandatory and in Canada it’s projected e-logs will be in widespread use by the end of 2019.

With drivers often on the road for many hours at a time and spending many days away from home, we thought a look at these two significant changes in the industry might prove interesting. We’ll be blogging regularly about “all things trucking” so stay tuned for more interesting facts and stats about trucking – across Canada and all of North America!

Service Pro Truck Lines – The Future of Trucking

(1) Ministry of Transportation

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